Almost Real Recollections

Yesterday’s multi-dimensional discussion of Viewmaster reels reminded me that my late brother had an urge for collecting some unusual things. For some reason, he was compelled to accumulate recordings of Prokofiev’s “Peter and the Wolf” with celebrity narrators. At the time of his death, he had obtained about a dozen different copies. I know he had versions that featured Peter Ustinov, David Bowie, Jonathan Winters, and in parody form, Weird Al Yankovic.

He also collected stereo cameras.

This is the sort of device that was used to take the Viewmaster photos. Two lenses, set about eye-width apart, would record separate, oh-so-slightly different images. On a Viewmaster reel, these images would be placed opposite each other on the wheel to feed each eyeball the necessary part of the scene. We didn’t have the raw materials to make Viewmaster reels, so my brother used a handheld viewer that could only display one 3-D image at a time.

A couple of his cameras are Realists. I love the sound of that – it makes it seem like the machines have a philosophy. Rather than click, the shutter heaves a deep sigh.

We had great ambitions of building a huge stereo photography library – something to prove to future generations that we, too, had depth as well as color. A friend even picked up a perfect little portable stereo slide filing cabinet at a garage sale – complete with some other family’s memories of Colorado, New Orleans, Michigan and Northern Minnesota. We meant to fill up the drawers with our own adventures. Alas, time won that race. But the cameras remain, accumulating a thick layer of dust.

I could show you exactly how thick the dust is, if you would just peer into this viewfinder …

What makes a sane person collect things?

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95 thoughts on “Almost Real Recollections”

  1. Morning all — I’m not sure a sane person does collect things. At least not at our house.

    My first collection started when I was in junior high. My folks took a trip to Kentucky and came back with a pig bank, but not like anything you’ve ever seen. It is a dark brown ceramic pig, sitting on its haunches with the cork on the bottom where it can’t be seen. It’s beautiful. For some reason that got me started. I have about 30 pig banks now, from all over the world – the more unusual the better.

    The other strange collection I have are my “Hand Stamped By” rubber stamps. No one needs this many of these things, but I can’t keep away!

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  2. Good morning to all,

    There are some collections that are worth having. Books and music recordings, if they don’t get out of control, are good to things to collect. I think the large collection of all kinds of useless things that I want to get rid of are the work of a crazy person. That person is me. I hate to throw away anything that I imagine might be put to use some time. When I thought I would use all this stuff I don’t know. I want to get rid of this stuff so that I will not have to pack it up and move it when we move to our new house. I’m sure there wiill be some useless items that I will end up taking to the new house.

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  3. ‘morning! someone please ‘splain to me the difference between collecting and hoarding. one couldn’t really call the mess i have in the pole barn “collections” of things. i can’t throw away
    1. screws/bolts/nails – they are in containers everywhere and not sorted 2. wire fencing, even if it is all balled up and twisted and 3. lumber – even the smallest piece that will never find a place to live. i tired cleaning the garage part of the pole barn so we can park in there this winter. i only piled all the lumber pieces in another place, saying “we’ll burn it in the fire pit” – right.
    my Mom collected salt and pepper shakers. made it easy to buy gifts for her and when i went to Europe as a youngster i bought a pair in each country.
    so that means that a good gift for me would be either some used, dull nails or a couple old boards, i guess
    thanks, Dale – never knew there were stereo cameras. fun topic. yesterday also.

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    1. I think your stuff comes under the heading of “I could use this someday”. At least that’s how it works at my house!

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    2. My father left behind a similar of unsorted screws/nails/bolts as well as bunches of window hardware (the little butterfly thingies to hold storm windows in place as well as those little metal glazing triangles – I think he bought fresh packages of both every year, used one piece form the package and brought the rest to his workbench). I needed a smallish bolt this summer to fix something at my folks’ house. One. With all of the accumulated stuff, there was nary a bolt to be found that was remotely the right size. Sigh.

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      1. so did you go to the hardware store and buy a bag of bolts and toss the extras into the collection so it would be there for next time? you have to ge with the spirit

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      2. I got a few assorted bolts and brought home the ones that didn’t fit right to add to my collection of assorted bolts and screws in little paper bags and plastic tubs scattered around my basement. It’s a family tradition after all. :)

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    3. Like you, Barb, I have a lot of lumber scraps, and those other things you mentioned. Then there is the old furniture, odd items to use for camping or that I thought I might use for camping, old clothes, and on and on. At least I don’t have so much stuff that I can barely get in and out of my house. There are some people who only have narrow paths they use with the rest of thier houses filled to thier ceilings with stuff.

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      1. I am sort of a hoarder, but there are some occaisions when I make use of a little of that useless stuff. At least I don’t have a giant pile of rotting firewood in my backyard that never gets used like one of my nieghbors. I do have a small pile of unused rotting firewood.

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  4. My grandfather collected wood planes. Skinny ones, wide ones, long, short – most of them have a wooden body, only one is all metal. I think he liked the feel of the smooth wood. Some have notes written in pencil on them of where they came from and, if it was a gift, who purchased the plane. In with this collection there is one 2-handled saw. Also, somewhat inexplicably, a piece of board with different barbed wire samples on it (with notes about the bared wire types). I asked for the wood planes when my grandmother was starting to sort through some of the accumulated stuff in their apartment – I was afraid that my brother might get them because he was a boy…I wanted the plances because they are a fascinatingly simple tool (which may be another reason my grandfather collected them), and because they connect me to my grandfather. Can’t bring myself to add to his collection – it’s his collection after all, not mine. I am just the keeper of…

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    1. I’ll mention again my cousin in Lamberton who has ever plane of every sort ever made by Stanley, fills his large basement.
      I grew up using a two-man saw.

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  5. Rise and Shine Baboons!

    Sane? Who is sane? I sit here with my collection of canning jars and equipment because my mom and grandma used them when I was a kid and taught me to can. Then there are the old cookbooks because they are interesting and, after all, why not? But I don’t collect goats…yet. Maybe that is next.

    Great day on the Trail yesterday ‘boons.

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  6. Ah, Dale, what memories for you. They must be kept, whether under dust, under saran wrap, or under indictment.
    My daughter would love the recordings. She did PatW many times in many places. She once in a city park city band concert gave it a PC ending. It was funny..

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    1. Clyde, is your daughter donating her kidney today? She has my best wishes as she prepares to donate her kidney.

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  7. Morning–

    I have a ‘collection’ of empty .22 caliber rifle shells. Buried down in the closet of my childhood bedroom in a little suitcase with a ‘bale counter’ to keep track of them. I haven’t looked at it in years – decades maybe even and it really serves no purpose other than it gave me reason to go shoot the rifle when I was a kid. I know there was 1000’s of them.

    Now days, I collect music I guess… and I love wood planes too! But I’ve only got a couple. And I have a light bulb collection. Mostly burned out ones. Started back in the high school theater because stage lamps were so odd shaped. That morphed into antique lamps, Bulbs from places I’ve visited (I ask first! Mostly…) and one from a train.

    My wife collects Christmas Santa’s. And misc rocks big and small. And she can tell you where they’re all from.

    I should collect my sanity.

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  8. Greetings! I’m afraid I am a rather unsentimental type.and have made a point of NOT collecting things. We have enough junk that my husband keeps around. He is a collector of wires, cables, electronic doodads, capacitors, resistors, computer parts and mother boards, etc. Even after moving and leaving tons of junk behind, he still has boxes of weird stuff that I would throw away in an instant.

    His stuff has cluttered every abode we lived in. Those little wire resistors and capacitors get stuck in the carpet and then you step on them — OUCH! We live in a split level rental house. The upstairs is relatively neat — not great as I’m a terrible housekeeper and not organized. It’s also a normal, slightly cool temperature.

    However, downstairs in his and the boys’ domain is a cluttered mess that I refuse to touch and he likes to turn up the heat as he is ALWAYS cold. Why, oh why do opposite people in these regards ever get married? I love him dearly, but our biggest fights are over the temperature in the house. If it weren’t for his junk, we could probably live in a smaller house, but I can’t convince him to get rid of it. Like so many of you, he “just might need it someday.” Thanks for listening, dear baboons!

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      1. While that may be the logical and simple solution, I’m just not going down there. Upstairs has sunlight and halfway decent furniture and i can open windows. Can’t do that downstairs — not many windows. He likes it hot and stuffy and I like cool, fresh air. We each have our own domain and we meet at mealtimes and maybe bedtime. He’s a night owl and I’m early to bed, early to rise. I like a firm mattress and he likes a soft mattress. It’s a wonder we still get along so well …

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      1. Nice idea. If they weren’t so stupid looking, I’d buy him one of those fleece Snuggly things you see on TV. But he also enjoys walking around the house in his boxers, so of course he has to crank up the heat. Yikes! It’s turning into “bash my husband day.”

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  9. My biological grandmother and my adoptive father (who were brother and sister) were both hoarders. Grandma’s was one of those stereotypical “path to the door” places, piled up with coffee cans full of rubber bands and the like. Dad accumulated paper–after Mom died I don’t think he ever threw away an empty envelope, and he had several dozen copies of “None Dare Call it Treason” culled from thrift stores. My friends and I discussed turning a stack of them into a lamp, but no one wanted such a thing in their house.

    A decade or so ago I was collecting komboloi (worry beads) from Greek church festivals, and I have a small Tarot collection. Then I discovered shitajiki when I joined anime fandom. Shitajiki, aka “pencil boards”, are thin pieces of plastic Japanese kids slide under their notebook pages to keep the pencil from marking the next page, and for many years have been manufactured with promotional art from anime, manga and movies. There are also doujinshi or fan art boards, which are even more collectible than the official ones. I get a lot of my boards from David: http://shitajiki.biz/ , an American who runs a cat rescue operation in Japan. I have about 500, ranging from $4 to $30, and though I’m no longer so rabid an anime fan I still pick one up occasionally from David, Ebay or Anime Detour.

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    1. Oh, I didn’t answer Dale’s question. What makes a sane person collect things? Let’s leave aside the definition of “sane”, which is a discussion for a different day. I think collecting is oftentimes a way to hold on to an emotional state–my pencil boards remind me of the pleasures of my favorite anime series/characters, or make me think of this convention where I bought that board or that friend who introduced me to this show. There’s also the excitement of finding a rare item and fighting for it on, for instance, Ebay (my roommate can’t do Ebay auctions because she gets too wrapped up in the competition). Other collectors are fascinated by specific time periods, technologies, hobbies, you name it, and end up with collections of baseball jerseys, antique needlework tools, Civil War photographs, train memorabilia or even stereo cameras (wonderful things!). Collecting is one of the more interesting byways of human psychology, I think.

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      1. There is a story associated with almost all of the seeds in my seed collection. Usually it is a story about the person who provided me with the seed. Heirloom seeds are seeds with a story behind them. There are some heirloom seeds that have a long history of being saved by people who treasured them and kept them from being lost.

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      2. Saving seeds makes sense to me as they are necessary for growing diverse food and providing sustenance. The stories that go with them make it all the more interesting. Plus they’re small, don’t take up much space and don’t need dusting!

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      3. When it comes to seeds, I do try to save ones that are valueable in one way or another. I do have a few that probably aren’t worth saving, but not too many of those.

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      4. Jim,
        I have an heirloom seed question…For the 2nd year in a row I got an Orange Warty Thing as my Halloween pumpkin. I read that it is an heirloom plant and that it used to be called Victor. Why would they change the name?

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      5. There is a lot of name changing that goes on when it comes to naming cultivated plants. I think that usually the best name would be the one given to the plant when it was introduced by the orginal developer. Some seed companies have a history of making up new names for already named plants to promote them or for some other reason.

        I have made up some names myself because there were no names associated with some of the seeds I collected. The people who give me seeds sometimes don’t have names for them and I need a name to use when refering to these plants. I guess anyone can make up a new name for a plant if they wish with the possible exception of plants controlled by patents. I supose the people who have patents on plants would control the names of those plants.

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  10. What makes us collect stuff? Obviously the latent utility comes into play sometimes, but when I begin collecting something, it’s that hanging on desire – “Ooh, that’s so pretty (or cool or useful or something) I have to keep that” – something just hums with your psyche. Then there is at some point a decision that 2 would be better than one, and 4 would be better than two. On several of my collections, there came a point when I said <Enough! and either went to a one in, one out practice (cookbooks) so it wouldn’t get larger (which also serves to hone the collection to the cream of the crop), or gave it up entirely (ceramic bunnies), which is what moving is all about).

    What I wonder about sanity wise is my love of sorting stuff. BiB, I would just love to get my hands on that screws/bolts/nails collection. It is compulsive behavior for me, which is no doubt part of why I attemped being a professional organizer. I had no idea how much the emotional hanging on would play into it all!

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  11. Dale, I love this about the Realist camera: “Rather than click, the shutter heaves a deep sigh.”

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  12. The pride or the pleasure of making collections, if it be restrained by prudence or morality, produces a pleasing remission after more laborious studies; furnishes an amusement not wholly unprofitable for that part of life, the greater part of many lives, which would otherwise be lost in idleness or vice; it produces an useful traffick between the industry of indigence and the curiosity of wealth; it brings many things to notice that would be neglected; and, by fixing the thoughts upon intellectual pleasures, resists the natural encroachments of sensuality, and maintains the mind in her lawful superiority.

    – Samuel Johnson

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    1. I like to think that’s what Samuel Johnson said to his wife when she complained to him about his cables and motherboards.

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    2. Well said. But you still have to display, dust, sort and organize collections — none of which I’m willing to do for the sake of sentimentality. It’s a nice idea and I’ve considered starting a collection of ceramic teapots or something pretty — but quickly put it aside as I don’t have the space or nice display cabinet for such things. And then it starts getting expensive …

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  13. i am in trouble here. i have the nails and the wood and the planes and the two handed saws (three or 4 of them) and a collection of bottles one of pages of stamps ( not a biggy but a couple hundred pages) a collection of prairie home companion shows on cassette from the 80 90, a collection of cbs sunday morning shows form charles kerault days to recently ( i gave it up) a collection of thousands of lps and a fistfull of hard drives of tunes from other peoples collections that i treasure. recording of shows i love or love. winter coats and bathrooms could be argued shoes my kids school work. my 24 year olds kindergarten drawings are still fun to look at, he likes it too.
    when my kids were little there were cards to collect and those little plastic figures which all had different powers and talents. there were school issues where they didnt want the kids trading because some were smart and some were dumb and the dumb kids would trade their valuabel figures to the smart kids and get crap in return. the dads would get balistic and want to know what kind of school would let their kids be taken advantage of. itr was interesting. when i was a kid i was a huge baseball card collertor. my my still shrinks in the corner when it comes up. eshe threw them all away in her one moment of cleaning effort i imagien thats why she made such a huge mistake, she had no reference, it had never entered her mind before. collecting is an interesting thing. the show on one of these off channels about the guys who go out searching the hoarders and their barns full of stuff that they would be willing to sell for cheap is typical teleision wher the littel guy gets creamed by our heros who steal his good stuff in front of their hidden camers and put it on their weekly time slot.
    i have to get back to yesterdays blog. saw it early and didnt get back to it.

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  14. As a way of processing the emotions of my divorce, I redecorated my home, choosing to go with an “Arts and Crafts” motif. That led me to begin collecting art pottery of the sort popular around the turn of the century. I soon had over a dozen elegant pots with wonderful glazes and appealing designs.

    Then I began dating, and the first woman I became involved with was a suburban divorcee and downhill skier who collected figures of Santa Claus on skis. She had about 200 Santas on skis on display in her home. They were everywhere.

    In spite of a great attraction between us, there were several reasons that lady and I were not a natural couple. In my mind somehow the metaphor for our incompatibilities became our collections, which hardly could have been more different. I used to stare at my turn of the century pots and try to imagine a home in which both collections would be on display. It seemed so ludicrous: a Santa, then next to it an old Grueby pot, then just to the side of that another Santa, and then a Newcombe pot. It was hard to turn off the little voice that warned me I was forcing things, trying to form an enduring relationship with someone who was as radically unlike me as an old art pot and a Santa on skis.

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    1. WWWOT-I bought a ticket to the Sing a Long Sound of Music this weekend at the Ordway. Is anyone else from the Trail or any goatherd planning on joining in?

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      1. we’ll be yodeling in the barn, B-A
        sounds like fun.
        WWWOT but kinda not – my s-i-l gave me a plush goat that sang that song when a button was pushed or hoof was pushed or something. i took it to work and the little kids just loved it. a couple days later we took out the batteries :lol:

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    2. I see what you mean. Definitely incompatible collections. Your pots were elegant and used for making your home beautiful. Plus you had a reasonable number, around a dozen. Santa Claus on skis just don’t seem the same sort of thing (I’m trying to be kind here). And 200!!!! of them – that seems, um, how can I say this kindly…like a few too many!

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      1. We all know the expression “a few bricks shy of a load.” My girlfriend was a few Santas over the top!

        This is an example, I fear, of the difficulty of finding love in one’s AARP years. When you are young you don’t have many definite tastes, and in a natural way you and your partner can build habits together. People in later stages of life are not so flexible. “Good god, you say you have EVERY Barry Manilow record he ever made????”

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  15. I suspect that we all, at one time or another, have collected something; I know I have collected lots of stuff. While I’ve never been a very deliberate or organized collector, I have nevertheless amassed an intriguing assortment of more or less worthless stuff. Anything, from free stuff like pine cones and sea shells to pricey items bought at pottery or art sales, is fair game.

    I collected Danish Christmas plates for a number of years, mostly because the mother of one of my Danish girlfriends would send me one for Christmas each year. I shudder to think about what I have “invested” in hand painted Russian and Japanese collector’s plates from the Bradford Exchange. I haven’t displayed them for years, they’re collecting dust in a box in the basement. Now I see them offered for sale on eBay with nobody bidding on them, so, like so much else, not a great investment.

    Some collections just happen. I own a small clutch purse that I bought in 1963. It’s a purse that I often carry when I’m going to the theater. In it is an assortment of programs and playbills of concerts, ballets, and other theater events that I have attended over the years, everything from Swan Lake at the Bolshoi to The Odd Couple at the Central City Opera House. I didn’t intentionally collect them, they were just never cleaned out and now they provide a fine trip down memory lane.

    Every so often I’ll cull my stash of books, CDs, LPs, whatever, and offer it up on Freecycle; you’d be surprised what people will take off your hands if its free. I can’t bear to throw things away that other people can use, so Freecycle is a great resource. I think of it as recycling.

    As to the sanity of this, I can’t say. In most ways I’d say I’m pretty normal, don’t usually indulge in anything in an extreme or compulsive way. At this stage of my life it seems more prudent to deliberately get rid of some of this stuff, but I know that on my next walk on the beach in Kino, Mexico some sea shells will no doubt prove irresistible.

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  16. I used to collect rubber bands. I had a big box full of them. That was when I was a little less sane.

    Of course, now that I’m sane :lol: , I’ve stopped collecting. Except for all of those Lake Superior rocks – I can’t resist bringing them home with me. I think it’s the idea that I’m bringing home, possessing even, a tiny piece of that enormous, compelling and intangible experience of nature and water.

    And I still collect musical instruments, especially old and unique ones. I love finding them in antique and junk shops. I have more than enough of these. But if it is really unique and isn’t too expensive, it could find a new home on my DUSTY shelves.

    Today I’m donating a large box of books to the library.

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    1. I don’t collect rubber bands, I save them. Hang them on the device that cranks the window open above the kitchen sink. :lol: Never know when they’ll come in handy.

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      1. Maybe we’ll have to take a trip up north and set our rocks free, Krista…
        I share your penchant and your guilt!

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  17. Summarized from an article I found on the ‘net:
    Dr. Steve Anderson, a neurologist at the University of Iowa says our need to collect may harken back to an earlier point in our evolution, since many animals hoard things, especially food.
    According to Susan Pearce, author of the book Interpreting Objects and Collections one in three North Americans collects something.
    Collections can remind us of positive experiences and important people in our lives. They can help us learn new things. They can be practical or magical. If you’re not a collector you might want to think about becoming one. Collections can enrich our lives.
    (Article in its entirety: http://ezinearticles.com/?Collections—Why-Do-People-Collect-Things?&id=2950472)

    Dale, those cameras are great! I toyed with the idea of getting a nice stereoscopic camera but just never got around to it. And those are really nice!

    I think everyone knows of my hideously expensive addiction to comic, pulp, and magazine original art. I was a very good boy this last weekend at our comic convention at the Fairgrounds and didn’t buy anything. But it’s only the calm before the storm. I’m saving up to buy all of the original pen & ink drawn pages from a former DC Comics romance comic artist. She went into coloring the comics after a few years into her career, so she only has 30 of her original pen/ink drawn pages left from the late 1960’s. And one of her main influences was Alphonse Mucha, so she drew in this very ‘mod,’ cool, nouveau style that no one in comics has drawn like before or since.

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    1. tgith. i was unaware of your passion for original comic art. alphone mucha is exceptional. i have admired his work for years. erte seems to have done quote well knocking him off in the recent past . good luck on scoring from the dc romance artist. send us info on how it turns out.
      the 1 in 3 that collect holds true in my life. i collect, my wife does not and suggests that only an idiot would collect like i do and then the third person would be my wifes mother who is a clone of the wife. i assume everyone else has the same situation and the numbers work out very consistantly.

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  18. I think I must be the Swiffer of old bottles… I move through my life, minding my own business, and they keep attaching themselves to me. Granted, I DID acquire some of them intentionally. But then they just began to appear… buried near the foundation or hidden in the walls of my 1880’s home, poking their necks out at me during hikes by the river, blocking my path to weed roots in the garden… you get the idea. They all hinted of a story dying to be told. I honored that story by finding a spot for each of them on a windowsill. That’s when the floodgates opened… the neighbors became privy to my bottle “collection” and responded by offering up every old bottle that came along. I STILL receive old bottles from family members each Christmas. One-hundred twenty-six bottles later, I still don’t have the heart to say “Enough, already!” Does that make me crazy?

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    1. I have some of those too, from very odd places like in the garden… have finally kept just the “best” and have them on my kitchen window sill – Need any more?? :)

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    2. I LOVE old bottles. Have a very small (5 or 6) collection of them. I use them as vases, they’re great for a single stem of whatever is blooming. At the moment it’s the last of the roses. :-(

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  19. This is a touchy subject for me. As an adult child of hoarders, I am determined to not become like them. But I do have things I like to collect…rocks from Lake Superior, picture books, cookbooks, other books…

    I know that hoarders never start out deciding to hoard so much stuff that it’s difficult to walk in their house or be so piled deep that a person could die and not be found for months (I read a news story about that, it’s true) so I’m determined to keep my collections under control. Steve’s collection of beautiful pots, because they are beautiful and he has only a modest number of them, is inspiring. Collections do not have to be clutter. Maybe if you collect something because of its beauty and not just for the sake of owning it, you can end up with something that brings a little joy into your life – and some collections of sentimental things could also be in this category – whereas hoarding can be some combination of never getting around to sorting things, considering things to have latent utility to the point of ridiculousness, and something else I don’t understand…

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    1. Edith, while most of us treat this subject with a certain amount of humor and make jokes about it, I understand that for some hoarding is a very real problem. I am thankful to not have that be an issue in my life. My best friend from college is somewhat of a hoarder. She’s a bright and extremely accomplished woman, but for whatever emotional reasons, she can’t part with things. For twenty years or more, she has paid for storage of cheap furniture that has been damaged by a flood, simply because it had belonged to a loved relative who had passed away. When her father died, 25 years ago, she could not bring herself to get rid of her old Toyota Celica, simply because he had worked on it. That car, filled with old telephone books and teaching materials from the school where she taught, was parked behind her garage for 15 years. It remained there until a new neighbor complained about it, and she was forced to get rid of it. I understand why you’re determined not to let clutter overtake your life.

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      1. And it’s been good to hear the humor – I think part of having a healthy perspective on it is to not take yourself too seriously. So while I may be determined to not be a hoarder, I do want to have beauty in my home – and if that is through a few rocks I picked up by Lake Superior, or some pottery my daughter made in high school ceramics class, then I should embrace it and not fear that it will turn into clutter. If I enjoy seeing it and/or using it, then it’s worth having.(as long as I know my limits – maybe a few rocks are good, but not 500 of them. Maybe a few hundred books are good but not 2,000. I’m kind of working through this right now.. now – a little while after a trip to my mother’s cluttered apartment, where she showed me some lovely antique things that she was going to sell to an antique dealer, but meanwhile she is hanging on to crappy looking stuff that is filling her home Something’s wrong with that.

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    1. A book title in haiku form…

      This Little Piggy
      Went to Market: Pig Rustling
      For Fun and Profit

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