Wright Brothers Day

Today is Wright Brothers Day, observing the achievement of Orville and Wilbur Wright in launching the first heaver-than-air powered flight on this date in 1903, at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. Accordingly, today’s post comes from Idea Generator Spin Williams.

Wright_Flight

Hi Inventors!

Yes, you! You may not think of yourselves this way, but you’re inventors, or you could be, if you decided to give it as much time and attention as The Wright Brothers! We were talking about them at The Meeting That Never Ends, and everybody had a lot to say even though nobody at the table knew very much at all about Orville and Wilbur. After all, we’re always in a meeting – we don’t have much time to learn things. But we’re pretty sure that people are right when they say the brothers invented the airplane, and we’re full of admiration for anybody who gets first place in anything.

But why even talk about the Wright Brothers?

One thing we’re always looking for at T.M.T.N.E. is to get in on the ground floor with the next big invention that will re-shape our world, change lives and make us immortal. If it hadn’t already been invented, the airplane is exactly the kind of idea we’d like to be involved with. The brothers could have used our potent blend of venture capital and marketing advice, but when they were working at their bike shop in Ohio and at Kitty Hawk, the science of marketing hadn’t been invented yet and none of us were alive.

Timing is important!

That’s why we’re turning to you – the people we don’t know and can’t see. One thing that makes you better than the Wright Brothers (in our eyes) is that you’re alive! That’s a great advantage you have over very smart dead people when it comes to thinking up ideas and making money off them!

What hasn’t been created yet that you would like to invent? Is it something that can be done with bicycle parts, paper and spruce? The Wright Brothers had their success because they understood the importance of control – something you learn after you’ve fallen off a bicycle a few times. While others were strapping bigger engines onto flimsy airframes, the bicycle guys were focusing their efforts on Not Crashing. That was a case of specialized knowledge (the importance of balance and control), applied to a common problem (defeating gravity). Is there an area where you have specialized knowledge that the “experts” addressing a Big Problem may not have?

And when I say “Big Problem”, I mean something like the annoying fact that Teleportation is impossible.

Wouldn’t you like to change that? So would we! Share your specialized knowledge and its application to a Big Problem, and we’re on our way to liftoff! We’ll encourage you and back you, and everyone will succeed. Years later, we might accuse each other of fraud and wind up in court, but that’s no reason not to enjoy some great years right now in an exciting and productive partnership! The troubles will be nothing more than a footnote, and we’ll all get credit for thinking up something big!

Your future financier/friend/foe,
Spin Williams.

What invention have you thought about that would put you alongside the Wright Brothers?

75 thoughts on “Wright Brothers Day”

  1. I had an idea for eyeglasses too, my kids told me they just saw it where you can hit the button and watch a movie or read a book on the inside of your eyeglasses for your personal viewing. I still like the idea. Kids said it was 4000 dollars or something like that

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    1. Sounds very cyberpunk to me. William Gibson wrote a character who had permanently implanted mirrorshades over her eyesockets in one of his novels (“Neuromancer”, IIRC). One lens had a time display like a digital clock at the corner of her viewfield. Gibson was hailed as a prophet and visionary, but he was dreaming small compared to that! I just wonder how they’d compensate for an extremely short focal distance to make something projected on the inside of a glasses lens viewable, particularly for those of us with corrections (of course, they’d probably just tell us to get contacts, which still wouldn’t work so well with an astigmatism).

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      1. im thinking how cool wraparounds would be. like tohe old 70 mm surround sound movies like grand prix and the cooper wow. now just give me the chair that rumbles in the car chase scenes and the things on my fingertiops to make the feelies form brave new world happen and ill never leave the house.

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  2. Rise and Shine Baboons!

    I have not really invented a thing; rather a method of doing business and of nurturing new business people who do what I do. Each therapist has her own individual business that she runs. We then cooperate in operating a group practice that requires a team. We bring on new practitioners and support and mentor them through the early stages and groom them to continue and participate in the group/team process.

    To the gym.

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    1. Sounds good to me, Jacque. I think the people offering human services in government agencies should get training on how to operate effectively in that setting and then join in with the private therapists teams to make services available to everyone in a good way.

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    2. Last night our business offices were broken into and burglarized. What a wat to start the week. Burglars took a laptop and iPod, wrecked 2 file cabinets, and jimmied the doors. Another suite was hit, too.

      Uffda.

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        1. You’re both too kind and restrained. That’s awful, Jacque, exactly what you didn’t need in your already hectic life.

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      1. No good. I hope those things taken didn’t include any materials that will be hard to replace. I’m sure a burglary like that is hard to deal with even if you can replace what was lost.

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  3. Good morning. How about a really good lie detector? There are some lie detectors in use now which apparently are not completely reliable. What if we had one that could always detect a lie? I would want to make every politician stayed continually connected to one of these. However, I think there are powerful people who would make sure that such a device would not be produced. Probably Spin and his friends would also not be in favor of the development of a device of this kind.

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  4. I would invent a machine that would turn leftovers into carcoal briquets. My husband has a nasty habit of turning leftovers into “Stew”, a gloppy concoction that combines gently used food with newly purchased beans and corn and sausage. It only serves to double the amount of leftovers, and only he eats it. He also freezes it, so we have containers of unidentifiable glop that sit around for months until it gets tossed.

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  5. Forgetting for the moment the “inventions” I made in the fields of writing and editing, there is one physical invention that has obsessed me for years. I keep thinking of this design wrinkle for–of all things–washers and driers. Anyone who has visited my home already knows that an obsession with cleanliness is not one of my character flaws. And yet I am obsessed with this idea I have for an improved washer or drier.

    Existing washers and driers have big buckets that you access either from the top or the side. It is hard to see anything when you look down into a top-loader. It is awkward to kneel to deal with a front-loading washer or drier. We all know how socks disappear. One reason is that people putting them through our washer/drier machines can’t see the soggy sock lying there in a dark corner of the tub.

    My machines would be just like existing washers or driers but would have wash/dry buckets tipped at a 45 degree angle so a person standing before them could look right inside and see the socks trying to hide there. Yes, I know these would not stack or ship as cheaply as our purely rectangular washers and driers. But I keep thinking these would be far better to use.

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    1. Steve, get a front loading washer and elevate it. Don’t have it sitting on the floor. That’s what we did with ours, and it works perfectly. Have no trouble retrieving small items trying to hide anywhere in the machine. Strangely enough, we bought it slightly used from an elderly couple. They were getting rid of it because the wife couldn’t bend down to load and unload it. The solution was so simple that I don’t know why it didn’t occur to them.

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        1. Nope, no boxes involved. Hans made a sturdy stand for it. The appliance stores actually sell stands for that purpose, but Hans deemed them too pricey, so made our own. Nothing to it.

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    2. I do like the image, Steve, of the appliance tilted at a 45 degree angle – it would just make the room so much more… interesting!

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      1. Thank you Steve, for helping me with this, and thanks to you also PJ and any of the rest of you who post today on this. I will not be online much, but will try and check back in tomorrow.

        The s&h is doing pretty well with this, all things considered.

        The toughest task remains to me: telling our next door neighbor and adoptive grandmother, who always told people who thought she should have her own cat, “I don’t need one, I have Twixie”

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      1. She was dignified to the last. Thanks, BiR.
        She also inspired us to come up with special grammar rules for cats: In a sentence with the words “cat” and appreciate”, “cat” is always the direct object, never the subject.

        I’ve changed my gravatar back to the lovely picture the s&h took a couple of summers ago.

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        1. sorry mig pets are the purist form of relationships. they are who they are with no pretense or bs. they love you and look to you for their love in this world. i thought it was funny when i became a fish guy that the ladies at the pet store would say “oh im so sorry” when i told her one of my fosh died but the reality is even damn fish have personalities. i had a five year old coy bite the dust earlier this week and a couple of months ago i had a 10 year old sucker fish die with some malfunctioning equipment. it is tramatic to see the end come. then we think about connecticut and the pain going on there and it all comes to a common understanding that love and relationships whether with s & h or cats or fish or dogs or grandmothers is all hard and not fair and too painful for words. i am sorry mig and i hope twixie is a comfort for you and s& h and that he learned good stuff for having the opportunity to be open and unerstanding with twixie and to understand that kmaybe just maybe a pert is good training for people you love leaving you. i t may be the other way around as bad as it hurts at the time but its all part of the circle. god bless

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    1. I know that loosing a special pet is hard to take. Best wishes to you, Catherine on dealing with the loss of your cat.

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  6. I think Gene Roddenberry was on the right track, and that someday someone really will figure out teleportation (if we don’t blow ourselves up first). I’m afraid it’s not I who has any expertise in this field, but it’s where I would put my inventive energy. Think about it – long distances could be a thing of the past, as would crashes of all kinds. Timing would be important, though – you wouldn’t want to be doing something like beaming somewhere while someone was beaming toward you from that place… so I guess accidental crashes could still happen.

    Will think more on this. Today I’m almost over the creeping crud that laid me low last week. Wish I could invent some robot to come and help me catch up.

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      1. I read a book a few years back about the real science behind some Star Trek gizmos and I am no longer thinking we’ll ever see teletransporting. Boo hoo.

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  7. I think I could come up with a widget (heck, maybe even an app for a smartphone) that provided either a juicy rationalization or reasonable sounding answer for questions. One thing I learned as a liberal arts major was how to come up with an answer to almost any question – they key to making it sound credible was simply to have confidence in the answer, right or wrong. There would have to be options for either a random answer or an answer based on situational clues (e.g., is this a work or relationship-related question, do you need a single phrase or short essay type of answer, does a number/color/name need to be included in your answer), and some other values or options to tweak the response to make the answer suit the question. But I bet it’d sell like hotcakes if I could find a good programmer to help figure out the algorithms for it.

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    1. Just what we need, Anna, another device to help us spew out more meaningless words. But I’m sure you’re right, such an app would probably sell like hotcakes. You could even develop apps aimed at specific professions, although I’d argue that most politicians and lawyers already seem innately adept at this without the aid of such an app. Or perhaps that app has already been created and put to use without the rest of us knowing about it?

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  8. I need a source of short pencils with good erasers on them that fit in my pocket. I don’t want the short ones that are available that don’t have erasers because a good eraser is needed to do sudoku. I don’t want regular sized ones with erasers because they don’t fit my pocket. Presently I have to cut regular sized pencils with erasers in half and I have no use for the half that doesn’t have an eraser.

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    1. What about golf pencils (which you can get in a few places… Party City and Staples both have them) and then add an eraser that you can also get at any place that sells school supplies?

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  9. I’d like to invent a device, a small handheld device, that you could carry around in your pocket or purse, that is able to jam or otherwise prevent a firearm from discharging. I’m envisioning a small remote control thingy. All ammunition sold to private parties could have some sort of electronic code embedded that would render it inoperable when confronted with that device. Ammunition for police or other law enforcement purposes would not have this code embedded, and thus would not be limited by the device. If we’re not able to enact or enforce reasonable restrictions of what firearms private citizens have access to, then let’s get to work on rendering them ineffective when in the hands of criminals. Maybe we just need to control what kind, and amount of ammunition an individual can buy?

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        1. It was excellent. Had a record crowd. Not too many leftovers. The hot item of the evening was a flower pot w/ animated/dancing flowers. Another hot item was a bobble-headed doll of Sheldon from Big Bang Theory. Definition of fun!

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        2. A record crowd! You must have had people hanging from the rafters. The place was full last year, but full is always good when it comes to fun people. That gift exchange is really fun. Sorry to have missed it this year.

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    1. Lisa, we had the same problem but found a handy dandy solution: an old wool sock (perhaps one that your washer or drier ate the mate to). Cute the toe out, and fashion a whole for your thumb, and voila! Your hand stays nice and warm and your fingers unencumbered. Seriously, it works for us.

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  10. OT – All’s quiet on the home front. Tonight we picked up Daisy, the 11 year old yellow lab that is now a member of our household. She’s now sleeping in her kennel, and Martha is vigilant, but relatively relaxed on the bed. The next few days will be interesting, but I’m confident they’ll become pals. I certainly hope so. G’nite all.

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      1. No, Martha is a tortie cat. A little spitfire of a cat. We originally named her Andrea after Renee’s cat, Andrew, that died last year, but it didn’t stick. She’s a Martha, like Martha in “Who’s afraid of Virginia Wolf,” if that gives you an idea of her personality. A very spirited little cat, and at the moment not too keen on Daisy. It’ll take a while, I’m sure, but I think they’ll get along…eventually.

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        1. My memory for names is horrible. I do recall that we named Martha after Renee’s cat, but since the name didn’t stick, I had forgotten what it was. We named her Alberta in honor of Albert, but she’s such a little spitfire that Alberta seemed to refined for her. She’s a Martha, no doubt about it.

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