August Garden Update

  • Oh my! the Baboons have been busy in the garden in July and August. Here are some recent submissions of garden activity.

Barbara in Rivertown sends these beauties:

 

 

Reneeinned sends these:

Here is what is growing for Anna:

Here is what is growing for Jacque:

LJB sends these lovely photos:

These are photos of August gardens.  What are your plans for next summer’s gardens? What gives you hope for the future?

 

 

45 thoughts on “August Garden Update”

    1. dahlias are magic I remember driving down a regular street I’m 99% sure it was 66th St. in Richfield for locals and there was a house that had a plot 12′ x 20′ of dahlias and I parked my car and got out and went up and knocked on the guys door and asked them to tell me about his dahlias
      he spent an hour telling me about his dahlias and while he no longer compete at the state fair he was a past participant and winner
      The Dahlia catalog to get a little crazy there are hundreds and hundreds and hundreds and you begin to wonder how different they can be this is stated from a hosta guy
      I can tell roses I can tell hostas and if you ask me can you tell this one versus that one yeah I can tell it with dahlias but it kind of overwhelms me with the sizes and the shapes and the different varieties that there are in Dahlia land
      always meant to do them but the idea of putting them in and having to go dig up those bulbs and put them in the brown paper bags in the basement makes her think it’s kind of the opposite of the plant that I need
      I am a hosta and daylily guy and if they die I need to be able to say it’s their fault not mine

      I do have some idiot proof watering systems in my brain that I would like to bring to market sometime so that people don’t have to over water or underwater their gardens and find out through experiment what would be the ideal scenario for each plant tomatoes are very different and roses are very different than potatoes as far as their needs go and I believe a watering system that dealt with the individual plant would be easy affordable and amazing
      you might even be able to grow things in North Dakota

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      1. I can grow amazing things in the Dakotas! I like your differential watering idea. We order our dahlias from Swan Island Dahlias in Oregon.

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  1. I have a garden plan for next year in my mind already. We have to move the garden veggies to different spots each year to cut down on disease. I am afraid we planted way too many potatoes this year. Lefse will be made. My 4th photo is of one of the large basil patches we planted. Next weekend will be pesto time.

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    1. I bought lefse at the State Fair yesterday. We’ve already rolled it up with jam. I should probably try and make it one of these days. Is it hard?

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      1. They’re just there to add beauty to the neighborhood. Also, a big plus for me is that they are easy to grow. Soak the seeds for a while, put them in the ground, keep them watered, and they grow.

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  2. Next summer:
    – fewer cherry tomato and zucchini plants
    – heirloom tomatoes like Jacque’s
    – Garden Boy off crutches
    – broccoli instead of brussels sprouts
    – weed flower gardens earlier
    – add butterfly weed and hollyhocks

    What gives me hope for the future is my belief that surely the Donald won’t last his full term.

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  3. There was a hummingbird in our garden yesterday. We see them sometimes this time of year as they migrate. It was too fast to get a photo. We get those moths, too, that look like hummingbirds, but this was definitely a bird. That little bird is a hopeful sign to me.

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  4. Oh, such garden porn! Love to see all your gardens — I’m a teeny bit jealous. I’ve been too lazy to get one of the Big Lake community garden plots, but I really should do this next year. At least set up a couple of my beloved Earth Boxes.

    OT – while listening to John Berge on MPR this morning while riding bus, he played “You’re My Little Potato” sung by the Concordia College Choir. I nearly wept, it was so beautiful and fun. He played it immediately after his “Movable Feast” bit with Rachel Hutton because they talked about the Barnsville’s Potato Days festival. Very cool.

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  5. I should have sent in my photos with the 4 foot quack grass and taller sumac surrounding my little starter flower garden…and the hostas interlaced with even taller quack grass and nettles. This article I just read inspires me to incorporate rather than eradicate them…and mow a grass path winding through them…plans for next year. Star Trib article http://www.startribune.com/call-of-the-wild-look-to-nature-for-garden-guidance/439904863/?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=dkw&kwp_0=499166&kwp_4=1793486&kwp_1=763050

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  6. Sorry I forgot to send in my photo. When I got home from the fair I really didn’t do anything else except lay on the bed and read last night. My calves are still a little sore this morning. Anyway for next year I’m actually thinking about putting my Santa tomato (those are little grape tomatoes) in a bale all by itself because it is taking over. I also have some daffodil bulbs that I nurtured from potted plants earlier in the spring that I’m planning on getting into the ground in the next few weeks.

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  7. Sorry I forgot to send in my photo. When I got home from the fair I really didn’t do anything else except lay on the bed and read last night. My calves are still a little sore this morning. Anyway for next year I’m actually thinking about putting my Santa tomato (those are little grape tomatoes) in a bale all by itself because it is taking over. I also have some daffodil bulbs that I nurtured from potted plants earlier in the spring that I’m planning on getting into the ground in the next few weeks.

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  8. Plans? I just have plans for the fall. Which is do a good job of weeding, cutting down plants that need to be cut down, trim some things, move some plants around, maybe even mulch some things so that I don’t lose as much stuff as I did last winter. I did a good job of cleanup last fall and it really paid off in the spring when I had barely any cleanup to do. First time ever! Anybody know what I can use for winter mulch?

    Whatever I do next summer will be working toward the view of making things as easy as possible so I don’t have to spend much time on upkeep. I got some free woodchips for some of my garden beds this year and loved how it made weeding easier and less arduous.

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  9. I miss my garden
    next year I will be here for the fall season and can plant tomatoes basil etc. in container gardens
    I threw a couple has to be in wherever I go and I have a fistful of plants that I put in here that maybe I’ll expand on for next year I haven’t decided
    I remember hearing the story about the fact that you could tell how old man’s life is by looking at his garden if it’s organized so is his life if it’s not that says the equal statement in the opposite direction
    I feel that way about being a man without a garden
    I hope to get this house situation resolved and to get planted myself somewhere permanent two years down the road and to get back into my garden visualization realm again

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  10. I just wrote a six paragraph story about my summer struggles to perfect my lawn and, as has happened a lot lately, had to sign in again to post with my avatar. My entire story just disappeared then. I don’t have it in me to rewrite the whole damn thing. Have any of you encountered this?

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  11. Maybe I need to add chicken poo to the straw bales?? Wonder what that would do?
    I have two plots of bales; one does well, the other doesn’t. Only 50′ apart, both get same watering, both get same amount of sun.
    Not sure. This was the second year of trying that second spot… It just doesn’t work.

    And I can’t get cucumbers to work very well in the straw.
    Pumpkins are coming along.
    Been getting carrots and potatoes and onions this year. And the kohlrabi was amazing! — all out of the one plot.
    Next year will just do one.

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