42 thoughts on “Rags to Which’s”

  1. In our discussion of brief blogs, Bill suggested just putting up a picture. I tried to find one of mine that would work, but they all those possible need a bit of explanation.
    Do not ask me for an explanation. I do not have one.

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    1. Oops. I did not know this was going to be up today. Should have waited to comment until after I had washed my eyes and put in drops.
      I mean: All my possible pictures for Bill’s ideas need some set up for people to comment. And I do not know what it is or why it is there. It would be better if I had taken the picture from under the overpass, but the sides of the ravine are very steep. I took this the summer before last.
      Maybe it should come under the category of found art.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. It is land or earth art. It will appear differently by change of weather = wind, rain, snow…and melt…
    if you were to photograph it periodically I believe you’d find movement…subtle or grand. The earth surrounding it will vary-change too.

    It actually looks to me like the green fabric put down when ravines or hills…are seeded……?

    Great 50 words or less with use of this photo Clyde!

    Liked by 3 people

      1. Wind can do a real knot number on items in the elements…speaking from experience hanging clothes on the line and forgetting….

        So if it were to have been blown up, around, down etc….all about so-to-speak…over time or even a really strong windy storm it could become knotted.
        That’s my best guess….

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  3. my take is that an employee of the state say the raw dirt under the underpass and to prevent erosion put down the cloth do keep the dirt from completely washing away. the stakes put in across the top gave way all but one and the wind rolled it over time to where it is and the shade under the underpass has kept a growth pattern form happening like it would in the sun. if soemone planted the right shady seeds it would take off. cbs coleus seeds would be nice. hosta or a moss. but some rouge invasive shade monger will likely find its way into a friendly environment with little in the way of competition and take over. its been a week since the inauguration speaking of a rouge taking over.

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        1. yep a good plant for the shade. grows like a weed and seeds itself if the circumstances are correct i believe. if not a packet of seed in april would make a jungle by june. hosta would be the most beautiful answer. the state should invest in a hosta farm for state properties what else doubles every year and cant be killed as it grows exponentially
          here is a bronze sculpture by my friend an artist living in texas whose art is well respected and collected

          http://hirambutler.com/artists/view/joseph-havel

          Liked by 2 people

    1. Its:
      A shroud for a boa constrictor.
      The tragic and twisted illustrated history of the invention of sleeves.
      The scat and lair of a hitherto undiscovered species of mammoth vegetarian cats.

      Liked by 3 people

  4. My theory
    This is by the way quite massive. It is hanging on a near vertical side of a cement buttress holding up the middle pier of a 100 yard long bridge. I do not see how it was done in any way but intent by human hands. I think some ones–too big a job to be done by one–found this cloth for holding the side of the ravine rolled at the bottom of the ravine and created art.

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  5. The draft of a plan to build a wall between Mankato and North Mankato. I could say a wall to keep Mankato junk out of North Mankato, but that is a local joke.

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  6. Give me your tired, your poor,
    Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
    Only a few, not many more.
    But only, of course, if they look like me:
    I doff my lamp beside the shuttered door.

    Liked by 3 people

  7. I have nothing clever. I do have a guess. MNDOT uses burlap to stabilize steep areas near roads that lack grass cover to prevent soil erosion. These sheets of fabric are sort of staked down over freshly seeded raw soil. Without the fabric, managers can’t plant ground cover because it so quickly washes away. The fabric in the photo suggests MNDOT was going to collect these things but, for one reason or another, didn’t get to it.

    Liked by 1 person

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