Baling and Traffic and Duck

Today’s Farm Report comes to us from Ben.

Mornings are cool enough I wear a jacket going to the college but don’t need it when walking back to the car after work. Starting to get some color on the trees.

Soybeans are mostly pretty yellow and the leaves are starting to fall off them. Beans are drying and they will be ready in a couple weeks. But if there’s too many weeds in the field, they won’t be able to combine until the weeds freeze or die. Combines are not made to handle green material; that just plugs them up. The entire threshing process is based on dry material shelling out easily.

Remember that field of soybeans my neighbors planted on July 8th? It’s looking pretty good; they sure got lucky with the rains. They’re taller than mine and setting pods. They’re not done yet and they still need some time before a freeze, but they’re looking good so far.

The dairy guys are chopping corn silage. That’s one of the things I miss from milking; I enjoyed chopping corn. It smells good, it blows up the silos easy and doesn’t plug up the pipe, and cutting up that entire cornstalk just looks cool.

I baled some small square hay bales for our neighbors. A field next to our property but on the other side of a swamp and creek and power line and you can’t get there from here. But still cool to be on the ‘other side’ of the world from our place. Driving over there with the tractor, baler, and a wagon involved about 4 miles on a busy highway. Some people are terrible about dealing with farm machinery. They pass on corners, they tail gate for a 1 /4 mile then abruptly pass. It’s just ridiculous, not to mention dangerous to all of us.  I can’t print the words I say about them. I always hope I’m bigger than them so that will protect me, but please, harvest season is coming, give farmers and the machinery some space and don’t pass when you shouldn’t. You can bet I’m wearing my seatbelt and I have all the tractor lights on, flashers on, SMV signs… it’s not that they don’t see me, but they figure they can pass me quick enough so it doesn’t matter if it’s a corner. Makes me mad writing about it.

PTO – Power Take Off shafts. It’s the thing that takes power from the tractor and puts it in whatever implement is being powered. For a lot of machinery, that shaft spins at 540 RPM, some things spin at 1000 RPM. In the old days it was just an exposed shaft and safety wasn’t even on the radar. These days, there’s always a cover or shield, but they can still break or wear out and they’re usually in the way at some point. It’s the end that hooks to the tractor that’s the tricky part. In trying to make them safer, manufacturers have tried different styles and ways to protect people from the spinning bits. Some styles are easier than others; buttons to push while sliding them together or collars to pull back while still pushing the implement shaft onto the tractor shaft. There’s one attachment that’s completely covered, but then you can’t see inside to grease it either. Many of those end up cut away enough to get a grease gun in there.

It’s a necessary safety item – a lot of people have been killed or injured from contact with unprotected spinning shafts, but it’s inconvenient. I was thinking about all this while hooking up the baler to the tractor last week and connecting the PTO shaft.  

I know you’re all waiting for the weekly duck report. I took their fence down the other day. I started to roll it up, but I thought I shouldn’t change too much too quick, so I left part of it for reference for them. And one night, 4 brown ducks simply could not figure out how to get back into the pen they’ve been in for the last 2 months. Round and round the barn they went until finally they spent the night in with the chickens. And the next night they figured it out. It’s a mystery. I hate to call them dumb, but gee whiz.

The Mallard ducklings are starting to run and flap their wings. I assume they don’t know they can fly if no one is there to show them they can, and they’ll have to figure it out on their own. I assume instinct will tell them they need to head south. And other years there would be random ducks that would sort of stop in to visit. So, I think they’ll get it figured out I’m just very curious as to how and when.

At our townboard meeting last night the sheriff deputy gave us his report on township activities. Aside from the usual traffic stops, animal calls, or serving papers, a driver was arrested and charged with a DWI. He lived in the area where he was arrested, but prior to his arrest, it looked like it might become a pursuit. Then he turned down a dead-end road, cut into some back yards, and figured he could come back out on the road and get away. Except he came back on the road face to face with four other deputies. Oops.

Bypassed any safety items lately? Why?

What’s overregulated in your life?  

104 thoughts on “Baling and Traffic and Duck”

  1. Over regulated is the right word, more like over red taped is the process of putting my wife in memory care. You do not want to hear any of it. The really unexpected issue is dealing with her meds. A substitute pharmacist closed her account at Cub yesterday. I won’t try to guess her motivation, much of it in frustration with me asking her to raise her very soft voice when speaking through the plastic shield. Ah, Ben, there is a safety shield for you. The home director does not want to use their supplier. So Sandy has no pharmacist right now. They changed her meds heavily in the hospital, and correctly. Result is I do not know exactly what she takes and despite asking for one for 5 days I don’t have a list. Oops. Started the thousand word essay.
    Health and safety issue: In the middle of all that I got food poisoning. All that happened yesterday between runs to the bathroom. I bought a roasted chicken Thursday because it just was not in me to cook. I have always wondered how safe they are. We have on rare occasions bought one when in a hurry. I bought that at Cub, thank you very much for my Friday, Cub

    Liked by 1 person

        1. VS, chopped up hay is called “haylage”, chopped up corn (the entire plant) is called silage. Sometimes it’s in silos, more often latey it’s put in piles.
          As Fenton says, it has to pack. In piles the machinery packs it. In silos the weight itself packs it (but you want the right moisture too so it will pack right.)
          It does ferment in the cement silos but the blue ones limit the oxygen so it doesn’t ferment and stays more like it when it was put in.
          Next the dairy guys will start collecting ‘high moisture shelled
          Corn’ and putting that in the blue silos, because you don’t want that to ferment. It’s good cow food.

          Liked by 1 person

        2. Sherrilee, most of it in England is made out of grass, it’s fermented grass. I grew up being told it was pickled. You have to get all the air out of it, so it ferments instead of just rotting. Easy enough with modern machinery, that chops it up fine. When I was a kid, it would be cut with old fashioned cutterbar mowers, (slow, finicky, requiring constant sharpening. My favourite, of course) and would go into the heap tangled, and whatever length it had grown to. We would have to level it with a fork, and roll it a lot with a tractor. I loved it, men were men, we bred tough etc. We lagged behind in Devon, nevertheless, machines would slowly evolve and cut the stuff shorter and shorter, just as well as more people went in for more silage. More of the goodness is preserved than with hay, which has been baked in the sun. The job got easier and faster as the grass got chopped shorter.

          Liked by 3 people

    1. Oh Clyde, I’m sorry for what you’re going through. We had pharmacy issues with mom too when she moved. Why don’t these places just listen to us,right? You’ve been managing this for years and you know what’s what, and then they change it all. How frustrating.
      And food poisoning on top. Man oh man. You’re a good man handling all this. Hang in there.

      Liked by 3 people

        1. So sorry Clyde. I have another friend who is dealing with similar issues. Her husband has FTD and ALS and is failing fast and it seems as if every day she has a different issue with the care home that he is in. So so frustrating.

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        2. I can’t imagine having to deal with both FTD and ALS. Either disease is bad enough on its own, having both must be a living nightmare.

          Liked by 1 person

        3. The thing that I’m struggling with is his doctor who diagnosed the FTD. If it’s common that some FTD patients also get ALS, why wouldn’t you tell the patient’s spouse it was a possibility? She was completely blind-sided by it.

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        4. I can see good reasons why you wouldn’t. To my knowledge there’s nothing that you can do to prevent or even forestall the onset of ALS, so what could she possibly have done differently to prepare for it? How would knowledge of that potential danger down the road have helped her? It would be one thing if having a surgical procedure or taking a certain medication could have prevented it, but that’s not the case, so why add the worry of that potential development to the mix? I’m not playing the devil’s advocate here, vs, but I think we sometimes we falsely think that more information is better. If information enables us to make better decisions, I’m all for it. If it only adds to our worries, perhaps it’s knowledge that isn’t helpful. That’s my take on it anyway. Hope it helps.

          Liked by 1 person

        5. Meant to go under PJ’s comment. If I understand you correctly, you are in favor of physicians choosing which information they pass on to patients and family members. That was a common practice in the medical community decades ago, but I thought few doctors now practicing exercised the option to withhold information. For example, years ago doctors would often not tell someone they had a potentially fatal cancer. I could sure be wrong, but it is my impression doctors have mostly stopped filtering difficult truth.

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        6. I was afraid that someone would interpret what I said that way, but, no Steve, I’m not advocating that doctors withhold difficult information from patients and their caregivers. However, I don’t see any point in telling a patient you have just diagnosed with FTD, a very difficult and devastating diagnosis in its own right, that down the road there is a one in ten possibility that you may also get ALS. It serves no purpose other than give the patient one more thing to worry about, since there isn’t a damn thing you can do to prevent it. If as the FTD progresses there is evidence that symptoms of ALS also begin to manifest, that would be the time to prepare the patient, or more likely in this case, the caregiver and loved ones, to deal with that.

          When I had cancer and one of the recommended treatments after surgery was radiation, I did a lot of research to figure out whether or not that was a risk I was willing to subject myself to. I discovered that one of the long-term side effects was leukemia. I discussed this with my oncologist because I wanted to have as much useful information as possible before making a decision. He told me that was true, and told me what the odds were. He also cautioned me that the risk that this cancer would recur if I didn’t opt for radiation was much higher, and, he added, if you get leukemia ten to fifteen years down the road, there’s the possibility that by then we’ll be able to treat it better than we can now. That was useful information to me, and I opted for the treatment.

          Liked by 1 person

  2. Rise and Shine Baboons,

    I love these reports, Ben. As I was reading through it, I was thinking, “Man, those ducks are dumb.” And then you said it too. Made me laugh. Ducks’ eyes are on the side of the head like horses’ eyes, which limits the ability of the animal to make sense of what they are seeing. Then the animals get anxious and aggressive. Or dumb.

    Regarding safety, I almost hate to raise the issue of the virus controlling all our lives, after the Thursday experience, but here I go. It is the most relevant safety issue in our lives, especially as cold weather approaches and we socializes indoors more. I have been looking at how to obtain testing so that when I visit my mom in a nursing home, or before we travel, I know I am not taking the Voldemort of diseases with me. I do not want to be the one who exposes all the residents and workers in a nursing care facility or all the passengers on an airplane. Then our friend Up Nort texted to say she is taking her husband for a C-19 test after their neighbor, who is symptomatic and refusing to be tested, exposed her husband to something. We were going to travel to Eveleth in a few weeks to visit them. These events convince me that I am going to be tested prior to traveling anywhere, but especially to see my mom. And now I am concerned about our friends’ welfare.

    Over-regulation in my life is all work and paperwork related. I am off work for 4 days and i will not talk about this on my down time.

    Liked by 5 people

    1. My State DHS has determined extensive, cumbersome, and unintelligible verbiage that must be used in all therapy documentation to ensure the State gets Medicaid funding for our services. It is a pain.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. I knew you two already deal with a lot of regulations and bureaucracy…
        I know at the college there are specific ways to do things and rules that must be followed. Most of the time they don’t bother me and I just do what I have to do in order to get money for projects or whatever it is.
        I think the business office needs a sign over the door proclaiming “Failure to plan on your part does not constitute an emergency on our part”

        Liked by 3 people

  3. I can hardly believe it’s been 3/4ths of a year since I’ve worn PPE. A hard hat, gloves, safety glasses, steel toed shoes and high viz vest are required on most construction sites I worked in the distant past. Passing OSHA training has become standard practice. OSHA 10 is the minimum. I keep my OSHA 30 hours card up to date. Daily safety assessment forms are also becoming common along with weekly Toolbox Talks. The jobsite foreman is responsible for the conduct of the crew. Enforcement of the regulations and practices varies from company to company but it’s easier to be strict. Some safety inspectors are looking for a opportunity to write people up. Payment for work can be delayed if enough violations are accumulated. One guy was going to write me up for not using gloves while installing vinyl tile. I demonstrated that I needed to feel the edges of the material to get a proper fit. I received a waiver but had to cut the fingertips off the gloves and have another pair for when I wasn’t executing that part of the work. Waivers are possible but a good explanation is required to get one.
    BTW. Children’s Hospital Cincinnati/Messer Construction also required annual flu vaccination and now c19.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. If I break down on the road in Spain, I’m required to put on a yellow vest before I stand beside the vehicle. If I break down, that’s what I’ll do. Otherwise, I’ll never wear one again. Likewise safety boots. I gave away my last pair, nearly new, when I chucked in my truck licence at 66.
      Luckily, it was never compulsory for me to wear safety glasses. So there are no bad memories involved in preserving my eyesight when I use my (unguarded) brushcutter.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. I suppose I never had a big problem with the PTO guards. The cover over the actual output shaft on the tractor, at one time was strong enough to stand on. A handy thing to step on if you climbed onto the tractor over the back, after hitching up. Some later aftermarket ones weren’t so strong. No doubt in the absence of the guard, I’d have stepped on the shaft. No doubt I have, many times. Just to convince you not to do it. And don’t step on the guard either.That’s not why it was put there. There would be a telescopic tube covering the shaft, with a little chain to attach to something or other to stop the tube spinning with the shaft. I don’t remember using that chain much. I don’t really remember if it was always present. I certainly didn’t care. I suppose sometimes the tube would spin. Sometimes it wouldn’t. And I doubt very much if I cared.
        Now this is bad behaviour. I admit it. I’ll never do it again. Unless I get another tractor.
        Actually, even the spinning cover was less dangerous than the spinning shaft. But not much.

        Liked by 3 people

        1. Flashing lights.
          Graham and I were picking out lambs, around dusk, in a field near a main road, when we saw an odd sight. A tractor and trailer passed on the road, with an orange flashing light on the tractor cab. What next?!? Graham said “Next thing will be, it’ll be compulsory.” I didn’t want to believe it. But I don’t know about England, it appears to be compulsory here now. I don’t care about safety. I care about preserving my tiny little corner of the nineteen fifties.

          Liked by 2 people

        2. The little chains on the spinning guards are supposed to stop the cover spinning. But they don’t last long – they’re often broken soon after installation.

          When I was working on the lawnmower this summer, I broke the safety switch built into the seat. I meant to replace it… but that safety switch is kind of a pain and I rather like not having it… I should replace it…

          Chopping and filling silos, there was a PTO shaft from the wagon to the tractor. But I got off the tractor on the rear right, and wagon controls were on the left. So I learned from dad; grab the spinning shaft cover, step over the shaft to the wagon controls. The other option was going out around the tractor which was too much work, right? Besides, the throttle and PTO stop lever was on the right side of the tractor and sometimes it needed to stop in a hurry. No time to be running around the tractor. So we stepped over.

          Last week I talked about taking the gear box off the mower. Well, the four nuts are underneath it. I have it supported by blocks and jack stands, but that only gave me about 14″ of room to wiggle under there and maneuver the wrenches. So I lifted it up with the loader and forks. Seems like a good idea too, except there’s not a safety support if the hydraulics fail… and yeah, they shouldn’t, it’s pretty rare. But it happens. Every year we hear about someone killed when something fell on them because the hydraulics fail. So, we take the chance. Because what are the odds?
          Farrmers are gamblers.

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        1. Yeah, cattle and hogs have injured a lot of people over the years. You never know what might get you and it’s hard to keep up with safety all the time, even though we know we should. But you have to get in there to move hogs or cattle, so we do the best we can and hope for the best.

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        2. Reply to Ben :Stepping over the shaft!! Shocking, Ben, shocking. I don’t believe I have ever done that. I give up on being dangerous, you are the man.

          And funnily enough, I hate walking under anything that’s held up by hydraulics. Though they usually break when actually lifting, or stressed another way, in my experience. Story coming!

          Pete Snell again. I borrowed his awful little International 434 with loader, to clear a field of round bales for my friends Sue and John, who sold me my cow, Sarah. Flat out across the field at the colossal speed of, I think it’s 16/17 mph on that model; maybe you don’t think that’s fast. The loader was empty, bouncing a little over the bumps. The last two sentences describe the situation as it obtained at one moment. The very next moment, it obtained no longer. A hydraulic hose burst, with the bouncing, and from being a bit fatigued maybe. And by the time I thought to press the clutch pedal (braking being unnecessary and even superfluous, I judged, in my lightning wisdom), forward motion was no longer occurring, and the loader fork had transferred from being several feet in the air, right up out of my reach, in fact, to its current position, dug into the ground. This being contributory to the fact that, yes OK, what I’m getting at is, we’d stopped. Of course the tractor was in a mood to keep going, and the front axle had lifted till it hit the loader frame, (OK, OK, that’s not very high, I’m not trying to exaggerate here), stalling the engine so suddenly that the air intake blew off, presumably under the back pressure. My very slightly later declutching, caused the tractor to fall back, so the wheels hit the ground again. Well, that could be the fastest I ever stopped.
          The law in England is, if you borrow something and it breaks, you are not liable. Makes sense if you think about it. However, I don’t think too many of us are going to take advantage of that, and I took the pipe to Murch’s and had it mended, and gave Pete his nasty little tractor back intact. As intact as it was before, anyway.

          I rode on a loader when I was eleven, and it was OK. But that was the last time. Don’t ride on anything that relies on a hydraulic hose..
          Cherry pickers etc, by the way, and maybe the cranes I used when I delivered buiding materials for a year, are exempt from this warning. Far as I remember, they have a back up system for if hoses break, and nothing will fall. I could have remembered wrong.

          Liked by 1 person

      2. I suppose this counts as a farm accident, but once my cousin Steve set a trap for a pocket gopher and caught an Eastern Spotted Skunk instead. We often referred to them as civet cats, although that is an incorrect name. Steve dragged it home on a long chain since the carcass reeked of skunk spray.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. When surveys are done about which professions or jobs are most dangerous, the results always shock some people. Being a cop is not nearly as dangerous as TV shows and movies would have you believe, while farming and commercial fishing are way more dangerous than is generally thought.

        Liked by 1 person

  4. there should be pto adapters for car axels for us non farm folk to access

    do i bypass safety stuff… yeah and that’s why my arthritis is kicking up

    most recent … nothing comes to mind

    it’s a mindset not a maneuver

    there’s a reason all the safety stuff is there and i often think that i do this but wouldn’t recommend it to anyone else or ever ask them to do it this way but for me it’s right

    famous last words … hey what happens if you do this …

    Liked by 3 people

        1. I mailed in, well, dropped off, the form for medical assistance for Sandy. County worker is very sympathetic and today I got a letter from her that most of me documents don’t do the job. Ok, digging deep, calling my accountant I think I have all but one covered, but he and I thought what we did covered it. Only says those were bad, gives very vague description of what would serve and I have to have this done by the 28th. Or what? They send her home to me I guess. I have to communicate very precisely to everyone in this process, but they can be vague and not communicate at all.

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        2. It seems to be a constant battle Clyde. You and your daughter will have to stay up with the paperwork and changes they slip in. I hope the county worker helps you out.

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  5. I love the header photo of the rolling hills of your farm, Ben. So beautiful, small wonder you’re content.

    Can’t think of anything that’s over-regulated in my life at the moment. When I do run into what seems to be an unnecessary warning, restriction, or requirement, I try to keep in mind that there was a reason it was put there in the first place. Talk about ducks being stupid; some people have them beat, hands down.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. I understand that people have different comfort levels with online shopping. One of the blessings of my life is how easy and affordable it is to order things like a door wedge from Amazon. I can usually click on my computer screen and have that object in my apartment in two days. I haven’t physically shopped for anything in many years.

      Liked by 2 people

        1. I think the point is debatable, Fenton. What is not debatable is the issue of my shopping in person. I cannot do that anymore, which means it is a good thing I have a different way to shop.

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        2. I knew I was asking for it. You probably know more about Amazon than I do. It’s probably a bit late to wish for everything to still be in little shops with names like John Smith and Son. Or the one in our village, that didn’t have a name. It was run by Mr. Brace, and a van came round twice a week to outlying houses and cottages. I admit it probably didn’t carry door wedges.
          It was the shop that didn’t have a name. The village is called Chittlehampton. There was also Hazel’s and Molly’s, though neither had a name over the door. Molly was called Mrs Moule to her face, pronounced Mule. I think that’s how you spell it, but I don’t know, because she didn’t have it over the door. None of the shops did, but then, we all knew who they were. I never thought about any of this before. There were grocer’s shops all over the village! I don’t think any of them said their name. I don’t think any of them had door wedges.

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        3. Dear Fenton, I can get sloppy and sentimental about some of the small shops I’ve enjoyed over the years. I worked in one for two summers. We had a lovely shop with real character, partly because a real character owned that shop and had his own way of doing things.

          Baboons are particularly apt to regret the passing of small bookstores. The Twin Cities have lost some unique and well-stocked little bookstores. Some, I’m happy to add, have prospered or at least persisted.

          And yet I would be lying if I denied appreciating the convenience of Amazon. Moments ago I made a purchase with them that exemplifies everything I appreciate about their way of doing business. My medical issues are so fierce that the convenience of Amazon is incredibly welcome.

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        4. Intended to answer Steve’s answer to me. Let’s see where it ends up.

          I’m glad to hear that Amazon’s business practices are good. I suppose, if they weren’t, Jane wouldn’t use them so much.

          I hesitate to talk about something that I only think I know, from hearing it online. Especially after the discussion that went on, on Thursday. But where else does information come from now? I have heard very bad things about Amazon’s employment methods. Maybe I listen to the Young Turks too much. If customer satisfaction comes at the expense of downtrodden workers, it doesn’t make long or short term sense. Its what the world is built on, and it’s a total mess.

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        5. The public radio show Reveal also did an episode on Amazon; I try to avoid Amazon if I can find an alternative. There are plenty of alternatives for most things I need to buy, and everybody does delivery. It’s not as though Amazon is the only option. They just want to be the only option.

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    2. A stick or rock will also hold the door open. Maybe a spatula, or old book, I bet if you made a big enough obstacle long enough, someone will find you a door wedge.

      Liked by 3 people

      1. If I had to bet my own money, and you guys know I don’t like to do that, I’m guessing that anything except an official door wedge, probably made out of rubber, will be frowned upon by the establishment.

        Liked by 1 person

  6. I am self-regulating perhaps more than I need to. Since home from the 2nd hospital/rehab adventure, I write down everything we eat, esp. Husband, how often he showers… I have a log tablet, and I was just thinking yesterday I wonder how long I’ll feel compelled to do this. But he’s not out of the woods yet, I figure, so…

    Liked by 2 people

    1. For several months last year, I kept track of who I saw and masking and distances and such. I finally quit that after we all got vaccinated and I thought it was all good… wondering if I need to start that list up again?

      Liked by 1 person

        1. Oh, but we really WANT to hear about the hemorrhoids, the spilled food, the caregiving duties….

          This was all the stuff of my childhood and I know it well. But I am glad things are at least improving for Michael somewhat. This had to be frightening.

          Liked by 1 person

  7. Connecting PTO shafts. Yes, the button you pushed sideways with your thumb was fine, if everything was greased or oiled. Only one person to blame if it wasn’t. But those collars! Grip the end of the shaft with the palms of your hands, and push the collar forward evenly, with your fingers. The springs holding that collar back were designed to stop anyone less than Superman being a tractor driver. I used to get in a frustrated rage at my inadeqacy to do this without a struggle. I like things that have been designed by engineers, in the sense that they understand how things work. There is no need for those collars to exist.

    Liked by 2 people

  8. There were still a lot of old tractors around in the seventies, that didn’t have cabs, and before this time, in any case, few cabs had the strength to stop a tractor crushing the driver in an overturn. Safety cabs became compulsory on new tractors, as did the fitting of rollbars on the old ones. Of course we all moaned about it, and I still hate seeing those bars on the few fifties tractors still in use.
    But I’ve related before how a kid overturned on a silage heap that I’d built. I built them steep for good reasons, which others didn’t tend to be too interested in. He turned over because of his inexperience on a steep ramp, and without the rollbar on the tractor, would almost certainly have been either injured or killed. So l’d have had him on my conscience ever since. A pretty annoying thought.

    Liked by 3 people

  9. Ben, your original question. Yes, I’ve removed the chainbrake and the safety device from the throttle from my chainsaw. Neither of them are macho, and the chainbrake keeps clicking on in transport. So I have to push it forward again. Outrageous.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. The story with the four deputies reminds me of an incident from forty years ago that I’m still too embarrassed to relate. It was vaguely along those lines.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. The deputy was giggling all the while he was telling us about this arrest. One of our board members lives in the area and had witnessed it, he just didn’t know who it was.
      I suppose the question could have been ‘What’s the dumbest thing you’ve done lately (with or without law enforcement’s help)?’

      It was years ago Fenton; fess up.

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        1. My son after all he has been through—cancer, divorce, lousy job, new job, money issues—finally got a chance to go out for a drive around Idaho and Washington. Got some amazing photos of sunset with rainbows over golden wheat fields. While he was there, his dog died. Old age

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    1. Thanks- the clouds really helped in this one I think. That’s looking north from the driveway. Just around ‘The first corner’ or “above the grainery’.

      Thats the “calf pasture” in the foreground… back when I had calves. The neighbors cows and calves use it now. And on the extreme right is the pasture “Behind the dam”. The fields in the center background are “along the road” and the fields way up right top are “Above the barn”.

      Liked by 1 person

        1. Like I said, “Above the barn”, “The flat”, “behind the willow trees”…. Dad would call them by the previous owners.
          Officially they all have numbers for reporting to the government.

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