George Washington Liked Ice cream

Today is the anniversary of the first commercially produced Ice cream in the US in New York City in 1783.

Ice cream had been sold in ice cream parlors in New York since 1776. George Washington is said to have spent $200 on ice cream  ($4500 in current money) in the summer of 1790.  That was a lot of ice cream! Thomas Jefferson had an 18 step recipe for an ice cream dessert  similar to a baked Alaska. By 1800, insulated ice houses were invented, so that ice cream could be stored and sold to the masses. In 1945, the Navy provided a barge in the western Pacific that produced 5400 gallons of ice cream an hour for sailors.

I love ice cream.  We don’t make our own, although we have an electric ice cream churn. I see that our strawberry bed is flourishing, and perhaps there is some strawberry ice cream, or at least strawberries to put on top of ice cream, by the end of the month.

What is your favorite ice cream treat? Tell about ice cream from your childhood.  (Gelato, Froyo, and Sherbet count here, too).

94 thoughts on “George Washington Liked Ice cream”

  1. The Icy Cup in my neighborhood makes a tasty affogato. It’s a cup of DQ-style ice milk with two shots of espresso poured over it.

    The forecast here for today is a high of around 90, so they will likely be busy at the Icy Cup.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. During my four days at Mayo a little while back, someone was talking to me about ways to be sure to get enough calories and fluids in. She said if it means that you drink root beer floats all day every day that’s okay. Apparently root beer tastes good to people who undergo what I’ll be undergoing. So there’s something that I can look forward to during the upcoming ordeal: I may be able to have as many root beer floats as I want!

    Back in the day, when we had neighborhood picnics, the kids waiting in line to get ice cream would chant over and over:
    I scream! You scream!
    We all scream for ICE CREAM!

    Liked by 4 people

  3. When I was a kid, there was always a gallon bucket of vanilla ice cream in the freezer and Hershey’s syrup in the fridge. The plastic buckets wound up all over the house (once they were rinsed clean) for storing everything from crayons to Legos to various project parts.

    Now my favorite ice cream comes from Milkjam Creamery – they have a super dark chocolate they call “Black.” Soooo rich. Sooo good. Also tasty, if you are feeling especially indulgent, if you have a scoop of that and a scoop of Indian Elvis (peanut butter-banana-curry). May need to bike down to Milkjam today.

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    1. Those ice cream buckets—Well’s Blue Bunny—of my childhood, then appeared in the women’s bathrooms at college because we used them to tote our grooming supplies to the showers. You are correct Anna, they stored many things. Still do, when you can find them. The other empty food container that stores things is metal coffee cans. We can only find those now at Costco with the Kirkland brand of coffee.

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      1. When I was a kid those big red metal cans–Folgers coffee cans–were the universal container. Kept my crayons in those. Fishing worms, too. Kids probably use plastic tote boxes now. Cheap plastic containers were much less available long ago.

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        1. The Folgers cans in our house wound up holding things like nails and such. Though a more creative – and off the beaten path – thing we had at our house that my mom put together was a stacked affair (I think three cans wide and must have been at least 10 cans tall, because it was probably 5′ high) of those cans. My mom fastened them together like a set of cubbies, spray painted them flat black, and tucked the thing in our front hall closet for storing mittens and hats and such. “The cans” as we called them (which confused my friends the first few times they heard the reference) were still in the closet when my mom sold the house last year. Kinda wish I could have take them, they were an efficient way to keep those winter things – I think they were attached to the wall and had to be entirely deconstructed when we took them out, alas.

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      2. Back when i was crafting artificial fruit for use as photo props, Blue Bunny was one of my regular customers. I imagine they used my product for packaging photos and maybe advertising.

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    2. I’ve used those ice cream buckets for lots of things, but the thing that stands out to me is using them for throw-up buckets when my kids got sick.

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      1. It’s soooooo good. I think it’s one of their vegan offerings, but rich enough that you’d never know it doesn’t have dairy or eggs. 🙂

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  4. Rise and Shine Baboons,

    Well, gelato in Italy has to be my absolute favorite—especially coconut gelato. That is a rare treat but certainly worth the trip!

    Closer to home: Pump House Creamery on Chicago Ave in Mpls. You can find us there chatting with my son and his partner (who LOVES that ice cream) sitting out front on beautiful summer evenings. The rhubarb ice cream is seasonal and very good, as well as any of their other flavors. My sister, who is allergic to dairy, says their dairy free ice cream is the best she has had (olive oil and coconut milk combos, I think). I will bet that tonight there is a long line of people standing in the front. It is such a neighborhood place. You see people walking with dogs, strollers, and elderly grandmas for their treats. Everybody is happy.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. When we were in Florence, we ended up eating gelato two or three times in an afternoon because we failed to get lunch before everything shut down midday.

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      1. Now that is punishment for losing track of time. Gelato. We ate a lot of it but walked it all off. The best thing we came upon in Florence was a map of restrooms. Now that was a find since public toilets are rare.

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Oh yes, I cream buckets. We still buy Kemps gallon ice cream. Vanilla. And I add peanuts and/or chocolate chips. There are ice cream buckets all over.

    Ice Cream Drumsticks were always a big treat during the county fair. I think they tasted better 30 years ago. Or maybe it was that I only got them when the fair was on. These days I have a box in the freezer downstairs.

    I had an uncle that worked for the Kemps Plant in Rochester and when there was family reunions he bought a 2 gallon container of vanilla ice cream.

    There was a restaurant called ‘Tinklers’ and they had THE BEST hot fudge sundae’s. The hot fudge was one of those you still find every now and then; I don’t know what was in it, but it sure was good.

    Mom and Dad had an electric ice cream maker. It was involved enough that they didn’t use it often. But it sure was good when they did. Course that’s when we still had cows and had real cream so it was probably extra good. And the ice cubes would jam up on the side of the bucket and jam it up. And I’d go to the barn and get a scoop of cow salt to sprinkle over the ice to make it colder.
    Yesterday, Daughters program made ice cream but in plastic zip-lock bags and they just shook it up I guess. Daughter says she didn’t make ice cream and I don’t know if her group didn’t or she wasn’t interested.

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  6. I remember people making hand cranked ice cream in the trailer court the summers we were there – that was probably the best I’ve ever had. I happen to really like Snickers Ice Cream Bars when I’m out and about.

    A few years ago, Linda and I explored some good places while hunting out the Twin Cities’ best ice cream, but it’s the sort of thing that never really gets decided, because there’s always one more place. Now I can’t remember all the names, but I think Izzy’s was on the list.

    There is a place in downtown Winona – Nate & Ally’s http://natenallys.com/ that has soft serve or hard ice cream, and a build-your-own toppings bar. As I recall it’s price by the weight…

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    1. I recall joining you on one of those excursions with the two of you to a small coffee shop somewhere on the East Side of St. Paul. It was the one and only time I visited the place.

      At the time I didn’t know the shop was owned by a woman I had met briefly when I had offered something for free on Freecycle. I knew only that she was a pet lover and owned a couple of birds and a cat, and had just recently had to put down an old dog, a dachshund.

      Fast forward about six month’s, and another friend of mine found a dachshund strolling down the freeway near Lakeville. We tried for a couple of weeks to find it’s owner through various humane societies, lost dog registries, and local vets. Nothing. Searching my brain for someone who might be interested in adopting this little stray, I thought of this woman. I emailed her, we talked on the phone, and that’s when I discovered she was the owner of the coffee shop/ice cream parlor. A week or so later she drove to Lakeville and picked him up.

      Liked by 3 people

        1. I recall it as a small coffee shop with a lot of locals casually chatting over coffee. It had a lot of plants and all kinds of miscellaneous “stuff” for sale. Was it the Coffee Cup on the corner of Rice Street and Arlington?

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  7. I know I have previously written about my favorite childhood ice cream parlor, “Flemings Ishus” in Stubbekøbing. Fleming was the first name of the proprietor, and no one in town called him anything but IsFleming. I doubt that anyone knew, I know none of us kids did, his last name. I can report that “Flemings Ishus” is still there, though Fleming is long gone.

    Fleming featured house-made cones, made daily. Three basic flavors of rich ice cream: vanilla, chocolate, and strawberry. My idea of heaven until I was ten years old was a scoop of my favorite ice cream in one of those delicious cones. Topped with a dollop of freshly whipped cream (none of that canned stuff) drenched in a spoonful of – depending on the season – home made strawberry, raspberry or rhubarb sauce, pure bliss.

    He also had an assortment of popsicles. I switched to those during the summer of my tenth year when suddenly the mere thought of eating ice cream made me sick. I have no idea why. To this day I eat very little ice cream; it’s just too rich for me.

    I have several specific memories of ice cream from my childhood. One of them was in connection with having my tonsils and adenoids removed when I was five years old. Eating ice cream numbed the pain in my sore throat after that brutal operation. I remember waking up in the middle of the procedure, only to have them smack the ether mask back on my face to put me back under. Medicine has come a long way since I was a child!

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    1. I got popsicles when I was in the hospital. And Sherbert.
      I’d wander down to the patient lounge\ and stand in the kitchen ‘grazing’. I’d joke, it was just like home; we stand in the kitchen and snack.

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  8. i’ve written before about my 4 or 5 scoops with chocolate sauce and lots of peanuts every day after school with a peanut butter and jelly sandwich to cover me snack needs before dinner as an elementary school kid

    the the hot fudge peanut butter malt irderat the malt shop that made it part of the menu (still there last time i went)
    i gave up ice cream a couple years ago when i started getting stomach aches after eating it
    haven’t done it much since
    used to do hagen das chocolate chocolate chip with real peanut butter mixing half spoonfuls in front of the tv
    i bought some orange sherbet the other day thinking i could try that without doing dairy but it has dairy…. required a nap after eating so it’s a midnight snack … last night most recently

    the right waffle cone is the perfect accent to a scoop of ice cream.might be the best combo ever

    Liked by 2 people

  9. Just read that Snuffy’s Malt Shop on Cleveland Avenue is closing in July. Love Snuffy’s, including their basement bathroom with the blue fish painted on the walls. The downstairs basement is not ADA compliant, of course.

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    1. they said they will look for another location in highland. the rent chased them away after 37 years.
      i bet they wished they had bought the building way back when

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      1. If they find another place in Highland, the rent will be the same or higher. It wouldn’t have helped if they had bought the building – the basement bathroom isn’t a practical option anymore, and it would be expensive to remodel modern restrooms in on the main level.

        The sad thing is that that space on Cleveland is going to be vacant for the foreseeable future. Like the drugstore on the corner.

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        1. Pro Pharm is closed? Dang! That was my pharmacy. I’d hoped to become a customer there again nine days from now. Apparently when I left Mac/Groveland things went to hell.

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        2. There a few independents left, including West Seventh Pharmacy, Lloyd’s, and St. Paul Corner Drug. I have recommended St. Paul Corner Drug before, as they have apropos of today’s topic, ICE CREAM.

          Liked by 2 people

      2. If it’s the basement ADA non-compliant bathroom that’s the culprit, it won’t be long before Cecil’s Deli is also going to bite the dust. I know that non-compliance with ADA has caused several St. Paul eateries to close within the last couple of years. The original Red’s Savoy Pizza on East 7th St., and the Barbary Fig on Grand Ave. are two of them. Fighting the frivolous lawsuits, the cost of the required upgrade, and the evermore competitive marketplace was just too much.

        I’m all for ADA compliance, but think it sad when some asshole lawyer has decided to make it his bread and butter to target local establishments that have been in business for a very long time because of this issue. Can you imagine closing Mickey’s Diner due to that? They are one of the targeted establishments. I sure hope people would rise up in protest.

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        1. Oh, yes, they have at least one on the main floor. It’s small, as I recall. W.A. Frost is wealthy enough and has enough space to work out the compliance.

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  10. bridgemans exists only at the minnesota state fair i believe.
    when i was a kid bridgemans was the only option other than dairy queen
    we didnt have the 41 flavors places in the burbs. birdgemansd had a sit down restaurant that served burger and fries and the most appealing item on the menu was the la la paluza that was 9.99 or 12.99 and i believe was advertised as having 25 scoops of ice cream as will as bananas strawberries sauces and whipped cream and the whole thing was served in a giant bowl shaped like a snifter so you has to dig the ice cream out with a long handled spoon. never ate one. never saw one eaten but i was i awe at the notion that a guy would order 25 scoops and eat it all. it was amazing.i heard about it being done but i never really believed it was humanly possible to eat the whole fishbowl full of icecream but i can still see the picture of the la la paluza in the header picture of the ice cream portion of the pink laminated tri fold bridgemans menu that never changed by one item or one price form the day it opened until the day it closed. they got it right but maybe the world wasnt ready for a chain of ice cream joints the size of a perkins. there was the one i went to on 100 and 494 this was when the freeways were new and bridgemans was in key location and there was another on 66th and 35w

    http://mspmag.com/downloads/29800/download/La-La-Palooza-Sundae.jpg?cb=8847b7ff2983a86839ac0731ca8581c9&w=%7Bwidth%7D&h=%7Bheight%7D

    i dont know how many there were in total but they were like the epitome of the concept and i didnt know there were others people in the market. i just assumed bridgemans had the ice cream corner of the business wrapped up
    that and the hjelmers drug store where they had cherry coke phospates and ice cream sodas, i think vanilla chocolate and strawberry was all they offered maybne neopolitan but if you got that you kind of had to choose what you wanted most of because if you just goe on scoop it would be mostly chocolate or vanilla with a little of the other flavor.
    i was a vaniila guy, my brother was a chocolate guy. he never never never ordered anything else. even when we went to bridgemans where i would get a peppermint crisp that was multicolored wonderland on a waffle cone and he would order chocolate. my dad got butter brickle every time and my mom would do the strawberry praline kind of thing
    but my brother he was chocolate. he always had the chocolate ring around his mouth when we were done and it would dry there. he wouldnt notice.
    thats the end of my ice cream chilhood memories doctor. thank you for the session. i feel better now

    hey ljb, what flavor icer cream do you put in root beer float, vanilla is the go to but butter brickle would be great or butter pecan or somethinkg like moose tracks or a praline thing.

    oohh, i just remembered licorace ice cream. geeze it was good. black licorace in a vanilla kind of base.

    i just about got target to go with a non dairy version of the dairy queen kind of ice cream you do the stuff that comes out of the machine and youput the little curl on the top.
    it would have been a big deal but the company in california dropped the ball and couldnt get me the final answers done correctly so it didnt happen. i think they had 500 stores at the time so it would have been great. the ice cream was good too. it was like soy based and the magic to it was that it didnt need to be refrigerated at the factory. it was a powder you added liquid to and stirred up as you needed it so the shelf life was way easier to deal with which was a major challenge for target at the time.

    biz and life sometimes intersect.

    life and life always intersect. and ice cream was there at a moment or two.

    think ill look and see if dreamsicle has dairy. geeze i loved deamsicle….

    thanks renee

    Liked by 4 people

      1. When I bought our house in 1979 I inherited Gladys, an old woman who rented the upstairs apartment. Gladys loved going to Bridgeman’s, and I used to take her to the one that used to be on South Robert Street. Years later when she had to move into a nursing home, I’d take her to one in Roseville. Are there really no Bridgeman’s left anywhere?

        Liked by 1 person

        1. PJ, a web site lists many places people can buy Bridgeman’s ice cream in MN. It looks like all (or very many) are stores under other names that simply carry their product. When I left Minnesota there was still a Bridgeman’s operation on Highway 55 (Hiawatha Ave) in South Minneapolis in the Longfellow neighborhood. I think it is now gone.

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        2. Yes, what Steve said:
          https://www.bridgemans.com/locations.html

          and if you want to see the Lollapalooza:
          https://www.bridgemans.com/blog/2016/06/21/la-la-palooza-at-2016-mn-state-fair/

          First year in Mpls, I lived on 27th and Dupont, and were just a couple of blocks away from the Hennepin-26th St. Bridgeman’s. Roommates (who are now Husband and s-I-l) and I would saunter over there for sundaes, and would hang spoons from our noses, etc.

          Liked by 1 person

        3. It was a pretty sad Bridgeman’s but still a place where you could get a generous cone of good ice cream for a reasonable price. Last time I looked, I think it’s a Somali restaurant now.

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        4. I don’t know when it began or if it was always so, but Bridgeman’s ice cream is manufactured by Land O Lakes. It’s just a brand.

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        5. There used to be a big Bridgeman’s on Lake Street at about 40th Avenue, near where we live now. It’s a leather cleaning business now but you can still recognize the Bridgeman’s architecture.

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        6. My uncle worked for Land O Lakes delivering ice cream. At work they called him Ice Cream Nelson. He used to get us the big round tubs of ice cream for neighborhood picnics but I don’t recall him ever supplying us personally with any. Of course a Bridgeman’s size tub of ice cream would have been a lot for us to deal with.

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        1. You miss the experience of the pure, unbroken creaminess that occurs when the root beer and vanilla ice cream blend together. Butter brickle is good, but when immersed in the root beer the pieces would interrupt the smooth and creamy experience.

          So. There. This is the very last word from a root beer float connoisseur. 🤗🍦🥤

          Liked by 4 people

        2. One of the things that a root beer float can help with is being part of a mostly liquid diet when you have mouth sores due to chemo. So any ice cream with chunks in it wouldn’t be good if I have mouth sores. But who knows maybe I’ll try some other flavors besides vanilla just for variety.

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    1. When I was very young, my favorite ice cream was Neapolitan and that’s what we would have at home. You had to be careful to scoop equal amounts of each flavor if you wanted to preserve the whole raison d’etre of having Neapolitan in the first place. Of course it only took one jerk with a preference for one of the three flavors to ruin the whole carton.

      When my family really wanted some exotic ethnic food, we would go downtown to Cafe D’Napoli. After dinner I would usually get spumoni, but I don’t think that I ever realized that Neapolitan ice cream was a vague imitation.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. i lived da napoli’s
        it was a high school favorite
        the wall murals and the waitresses with hair piled high in the 1970’s exactly as they had piled it in the 50’s and 60’s
        they were the best waitress ever
        cheese canalonni
        and an extra order of bread
        no skimpy portions at da nap’s
        i was always to full of pasta to do dessert

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  11. A woman friend lived across the street from the Bridgeman’s in Dinkytown. The manager told the police she should be jailed for walking around nude in her apartment. The cops told him he should spend less time with binoculars by the plate glass window of his store.

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    1. Robin was working at that Bridgeman’s in Dinkytown in 1969 when we first met. I was working across the street and down the block at Art Materials. Was your friend living above Gray’s Drug or across Fourth Street? Just curious…

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    1. Bah humbug to autocorrect. Hmph. I will need some ice cream to get my serenity back after it changed histories. Will it do it again?

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    2. Good point. Ice cream at that point in time had to be quite the undertaking. And $200 worth??
      Course you’d have an excuse to eat it all. (With a lack of freezer space available at first).

      Strawberries on vanilla are pretty nice.
      Next are fresh wild blackberries on vanilla.

      Liked by 1 person

        1. Yes, butter pecan, chocolate almond fudge… anything with nuts in it, but please no marshmallow. Maple walnut if it’s Haagen Dazs, or anything without the artificial maple flavor. No coffee flavors (in anything) please.
          Hmmm, I don’t consider myself a picky eater, but I guess with ice cream I might be…

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    3. I seem to recall that Jefferson brought ice cream (the recipe, not the stuff itself) back from France, but I’d have to research to discover if that’s true.

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    4. When I saw that figure of $4500 in today’s dollars, my thought was that he must’ve been buying for a lot of people. I suppose if you spent $25 a day at an ice cream shop, you’d be up to $4500 in about half a year. $25 a day would be kind of a lot of ice cream for one person, but Martha had kids and grandkids, and for a family, it would be fairly easy to do that. Especially at the sort of artisan ice cream shops that are around now.

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  12. Our phone rang at seven o’clock this morning. I had managed to go back to sleep after a couple of hours awake during the night, so I didn’t answer. It just rang again a few minutes ago. It was our neighbor from across the street wanting to know if we were aware that there’s a black dude on our front steps. He’s been there for at least three hours, Conrad informed me.

    I went out to investigate. Turns out that the squatter situation in the house next door, has now spilled over to us. The man on my front steps, high on drugs, is a “friend” of next door neighbor’s drug addicted daughter. She’s out there, too, trying to keep him calm, and she’s not supposed to be anywhere near their house. When I asked what was going on, Lena mumbled something in reply, but at such a low volume that I couldn’t hear what it was. She was obviously afraid to upset him. So, I repeated my query, this time loud enough for him to hear me. He turned around, looked at me and explained that he has been locked out of his house, and now his girlfriend won’t let him in, either. “So you’re having a bad day already,” I asked? “Well, it’s too early to tell, there are several hours to go before I’ll know,” he responded. I patted him on the shoulder and said, “well, you take care,” and went back inside.

    I swear, if I had any ice cream in the freezer I’d give him some. maybe I could turn the tide for him.

    Can’t wait for July 31, to roll around. That’s the date the squatters have been given to vacate the house, or they’ll be evicted by the Sheriff’s office. It may be a long couple of months.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I commend you on treating like a human being having a bad day. There are a lot of other options you could have taken there.

      Ice cream would have been nice.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. When I was a kid, my parents had a lake cabin near the town of Waverly in Wright County, less than an hour from the twin cities. We would spend much of the summer there, as it was close enough that my father would commute into work. As I reached my teen-age years, I began spending more time up in town with the kids my age and less down on the lake.
    The town’s business district in the early sixties, although it was little more than a block long, was fairly complete, with a supermarket, a cafe and a restaurant, two hardware stores, a bowling alley (where the pins were still set by hand), the WPA-built city hall, a movie theater (that had by that time closed), and a drug store. The drug store, Dredge’s Pharmacy was classic. Wood plank floors and tin ceiling. At the front of the store were the sort of small miscellaneous goods you would find in a Woolworth’s or Ben Franklin of that era. Toward the back, in the cool dark interior, was the pharmacy, and at the end of a long rack of comic books, a four or five seat soda fountain. The pharmacist, Homer Dredge, by virtue of his training as a pharmacist probably one of the best educated men in town, was the soda jerk. Behind the marble counter of the soda fountain were the various pharmaceutical products, some of them, like Swamp Root, Wizard Oil and Lydia Pinkham’s remedies, had apparently been there a long time but all were unironically offered for sale. Many were the hot afternoons where a gaggle of us sat at the counter nursing our phosphates and cherry cokes (I had a soft spot for grape floats, with grape Nehi and vanilla ice cream) while Homer Dredge chatted with us. Another place, another time…

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  14. Lately I have enjoyed Haagen Daz vanilla with a banana. Pretty plain but good. Our Tortie, Millie, sits right by me waiting for the ambrosial moment when she gets to lick out the bowl.

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  15. All of this talk about ice cream made me think of an old lady, Mrs. Rasmussen, who lived next door to my very first address in the US on Talbot Court in Cheyenne, Wyoming. She was a 79 year old widow of Danish descent. Perhaps because of this, she and I quickly became fast friends.

    Once I got my driver’s license, I’d take her shopping once a week, and she’d always want to stop at the local Dairy Queen on the way home. But she was a slow eater, and inevitably her ice cream would be running down her forearms and from there drip onto everything within reach. Invariably, I’d have to clean up the car after such a trip.

    Her eyesight was poor, and she was rather shaky, so she’d also make a mess when eating. I took to covering the floor around and beneath her chair with newspaper whenever she’d come over for dinner.

    She was a sweet old lady, and a lot of fun to visit with. For her 80th birthday she invited about ten people to celebrate with her at a local restaurant. She really loved the punch they were serving with the mostly sweet offerings of food, and kept asking wasband to refill her glass. By the time we drove her home at the end of the afternoon, Mrs. Rasmussen was a little tipsy and feeling no pain, but she’d had a grand celebration.

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  16. my grandma had a hand crank ice cream maker and told us just to keep going. crank more. you cant stop once you start. i was like 8 and i was one of the older cousins. we would take turns cranking for 4 or 5 minutes then passing it on. i am certain it was at least an hour before it was proclaimed ice cream. then the ice cream was done and the grandparents proclaimed it the best ice cream ever. i couldnt appreciate it. it was vanilla and it was fine but not worth the hour of cranking to get a small bowl. i bet we did it twice and then when they talked about it again i found somewhere else to be.

    Liked by 1 person

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